Saturday, October 17, 2009

Notice of Indigenous Standing under Natural Law

MAP OF ANCIENT AFRICA-AMEXEM [MODERN DAY AMERICAS]
____________________________________________________ MAP OF ANCIENT ETHIOPIA AND ETHIOPIC OCEAN [MODERN DAY AFRICA AND ATLANTIC OCEAN]
____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ DIVINE CLAIM OF THE AKAN MOOR; DIVINE LIVING BEING
____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ BORN ON ATLAN/NORTHWEST AMEXEM/TURTLE ISLAND; AN AUTOCHTHON/INDIGENOUS MAN [MOOR] THROUGH THE ANCESTRAL BLOODLINES FROM TA NETER/ALKEBULAN; AFRICA
_____________________________________________________ The Akan are a large ethno-linguistic indigenous group or ethnic nation decent from Ta Neter/Alkebulan; Africa. They speak the Akan languages. The Akan's various indigenous groups constitute approximately 99.6 percent of Akanland and 58 percent of Ghana's total population, and around 20 million individuals throughout the region of West Africa. The Akan and Akanland share borders with Ivory Coast in the west, the Black Volta River in the north, the Atlantic ocean to the south, and the Volta River to the east. There are also substantial indigenous Akan communities in Amexem [Jamaica, Surinam, Brazil, Cuba, and elsewhere in North and South America and the Caribbean]. ____________________________________________________ FLAG MAP AND SYMBOL OF AKANLAND
http://www.slideshare.net/rbgstreetscholar1/the-akan-other-africans-and-the-sirius-star-system ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ EWE ____________________________________________________ Unlike the political and social organization of the Akan, where matrilineal rule prevails, the Ewe are essentially a patrilineal indigenous people. The founder of a community became the chief and was usually succeeded by his paternal relatives. The largest independent political unit was a chiefdom, the head of which was essentially a ceremonial figure who was assisted by a council of elders. Chiefdoms ranged in population from a few hundred people in one or two villages to several thousand in a chiefdom with a large number of villages and surrounding countryside. Unlike the Asante among the Akan, no Ewe chiefdom gained hegemonic power over its neighbor. The rise of Ewe nationalism in both Ghana and Togo was more of a reaction to the May 1956 plebiscite that partitioned Eweland between the Gold Coast and Togo(Cush/Tamaure/Alkebulan/"Africa") than to any sense of overriding ethnic indigenous unity. FLAG OF THE EWE PEOPLE
____________________________________________________ LAND CLAIM OF STANDING; ASSOCIATION WITH THE WASHITAW DE DUGDAMOUNDYAH MU'URS[MOORS]; UNITED NATIONS INDIGENOUS PEOPLES ORGANIZATION NUMBER 215/93